The Election of 2016 & Demographics

The Election of 2016 & Demographics

By Molly Schramm

The 2016 Presidential Election has surely been wild. From email scandals to fat-shaming comments, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have kept all citizens on the edge of their seats waiting for the next big scandal or blow-out. It almost seems more like a movie that should be accompanied with popcorn, than the election of our country’s president—our highest official.

As a teenager in today’s society, it’s interesting to see the two campaigns play out. Trump is loud and strong-minded while Hillary is hard-hitting and prepared. Their demeanors are complete opposites. My theory is that the older generations resonate with Trump, while the younger generations resonate with Clinton. To test my theory, I went out and asked Seton students and faculty some questions.

FACULTY:

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The 10% of faculty that said it depends expressed how the context of their opinion mattered. For instance, politically they’re not being listened too, but retrospectively older people primarily advertise to young adults and cater to them.

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STUDENTS:

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It’s interesting to see the contrast between the faculty and students. The faculty and students, obviously being in different age groups, seemingly had completely opposite opinions on this question.chart-6chart-5

This was the most surprising answer in my opinion. If you compare the charts between the faculty and students, you can obviously see the weariness in the faculty’s choices. Voting for a president is no easy feat; however, it seems like the students (even if they cannot actually vote) seem to have the answers.

This election is a whirlwind. With new emails arising and tapes from decades ago creating backlash in the Trump campaign, it’s undeniable one of the most complex elections we’ve had in American history. But the only responsibility we have as citizens is to vote and make our opinions heard, no matter your political stance. And for those who cannot vote, become informed, and educate yourself on the issues for when next election rolls around.

 

 

Welcome Back!

Welcome Back!

By Erin Gardner

Hello, Seton!

For those of you that don’t know me, I am Erin Gardner.  I am a senior and am The Seton Connection’s editor.  You might have seen me around at StrongHer or French Club meetings.  A little bit about me: I love cold pizza, coffee, and my favorite book is The Outsiders. 

The Seton Connection, is digitalized and is accessible from anywhere.  This year is a bit different from last year; Mrs. Lauber and Mrs. Vanover collectively teach Publications. The girls in the class will be covering one article per quarter, and topics include events around Seton, world news, and local news.  There will be structured content on a consistent basis.

Last year, we, the Publications class, kick started a platform at Seton through the paper called Writer’s Block.  There is an introductory post here: https://setonconnection.org/2015/12/17/writers-block/.  Writer’s Block is a community of inspiration, via the newspaper, created for Seton by Seton.  The purpose of Writer’s Block is to create a dedicated sisterhood of inspiration that is safe and welcoming.  Anyone can write for The Seton Connection. Feel free to submit a short story, poem, research paper, or journal page that you would like to share.  The submission will be edited for content, and, if approved, it will be published. If you wish, you can submit your piece anonymously.

I hope that you take advantage of The Seton Connection and all that it has to offer. Please remember that this paper is created for Seton students for the Seton community, so please let us know what YOU want to see and read.  Comments help us know what works and what doesn’t, so please don’t be shy of the comment section.

I wish you the best of luck of this school year, friends. If you would like to see anything covered or have any questions, please email me: erin.gardner@setoncincinnati.org.

 

Taking Justice into Your Own Hands?

Taking Justice into Your Own Hands?

Charniqa Stephens Davis

Twenty minutes of power and control for him is providing an unshakeable amount of pain and fear for his victim. Brock Turner only served three months of his six-month sentence in a Santa Clara jail for the sexual assault of an unconscious woman. He served only half of his sentence for “good behavior”. But this begs the question “was justice actually served?”. Brock Turner’s neighbors don’t seem to think so. Many of the people in his hometown of Oakwood, Ohio seem to be opposed to his early release.

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Written Protest, US Uncut

The sidewalks have the words “RAPIST” drawn on them with chalk and arrows point to the Turner home, warning the neighborhood of the convicted felon’s presence. It’s understandable that local residents are weary of Turner being in the place where they live, work, and play, but perhaps the question is whether or not Turner should be allowed these same freedoms without objection.The sidewalks have the words “RAPIST” drawn on them with chalk and arrows point to the Turner home, warning the neighborhood of the convicted felon’s presence. It’s understandable that local residents are weary of Turner being in the place where they live, work, and play, but perhaps the question is whether or not Turner should be allowed these same freedoms without objection.

neighbors

Armed Protestors, US Uncut

Should the people of Oakwood be so active in their protest? People must think about this from different perspectives. Turner’s family is not to blame for his crimes, but where is the line drawn? Yes, people have every right to express their outrage, but the family also has the right to fear for the safety of a loved one. The term “taking justice into our own hands” should not be one sided, even though it is hard to separate personal feelings from certain issues. I ask that readers consider this logic before approaching important issues. So before you start playing tiny violins inside your head, as humans, as emotional beings, you must ask ourselves this — at what point should a parent stop protecting their child?