A Poem Worth a Read

A Poem Worth a Read

By Rachel Richter

poem article

Every week, in Mrs. Hollenbach’s junior AP English class, she has her students get together in writing circles.  The students gather into small groups and write about a different topic each week.  This exercise allows students to improve their writing skills and learn about the depths of writing.

As a part of this English assignment, junior McKenzie Frommeyer wrote a poem that moved her classmates and Mrs. Hollenbach.  Frommeyer describes that day in English, “My writing circle decided the topic would be something you are looking forward to. I chose summer. Because of the weather I’m sure everyone is looking forward to summer so I thought, why not write about it?”  Frommeyer continues, “During summer the air becomes pure and when school lets out, students really forget about their work and just relax. They don’t want to look back at school they want to keep moving forward into summer. However, because of the cold weather I wrote how summer may never come.”

Her poem ended up being so much more than simple words about summer.  It can be interpreted many ways, and spark endless ideas and memories within a person.  Frommeyer explains that her poem “was actually supposed to be about society and power, and how the smallest things mean nothing to people now in society, and also about how I look forward to a time where the simplest things mean the most.”  However you choose to interpret the poem, it is very moving and inspirational.  Below you can read, enjoy, and be inspired by Mckenzie Frommeyer’s poem.

 

 

Forward

I look forward to the days where there are no worries

where air is pure

I yearn for what may never come

waiting for summer;

a subject of nothingness

forward

not stationary

I look forward to a time where nothingness means something

the smallest things mean nothing

I look forward to a state of oblivion

where no one knows nothing

though I yearn for what may never come

because the urge to have knowledge takes over the souls of the nothingness​

 

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