Taking Justice into Your Own Hands?

Taking Justice into Your Own Hands?

Charniqa Stephens Davis

Twenty minutes of power and control for him is providing an unshakeable amount of pain and fear for his victim. Brock Turner only served three months of his six-month sentence in a Santa Clara jail for the sexual assault of an unconscious woman. He served only half of his sentence for “good behavior”. But this begs the question “was justice actually served?”. Brock Turner’s neighbors don’t seem to think so. Many of the people in his hometown of Oakwood, Ohio seem to be opposed to his early release.

sidewalk

Written Protest, US Uncut

The sidewalks have the words “RAPIST” drawn on them with chalk and arrows point to the Turner home, warning the neighborhood of the convicted felon’s presence. It’s understandable that local residents are weary of Turner being in the place where they live, work, and play, but perhaps the question is whether or not Turner should be allowed these same freedoms without objection.The sidewalks have the words “RAPIST” drawn on them with chalk and arrows point to the Turner home, warning the neighborhood of the convicted felon’s presence. It’s understandable that local residents are weary of Turner being in the place where they live, work, and play, but perhaps the question is whether or not Turner should be allowed these same freedoms without objection.

neighbors

Armed Protestors, US Uncut

Should the people of Oakwood be so active in their protest? People must think about this from different perspectives. Turner’s family is not to blame for his crimes, but where is the line drawn? Yes, people have every right to express their outrage, but the family also has the right to fear for the safety of a loved one. The term “taking justice into our own hands” should not be one sided, even though it is hard to separate personal feelings from certain issues. I ask that readers consider this logic before approaching important issues. So before you start playing tiny violins inside your head, as humans, as emotional beings, you must ask ourselves this — at what point should a parent stop protecting their child?

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